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FULL SUPER BLUE BLOOD MOON

Full Super Blue Blood Moon

ESBAT

January 31, 2018

SUPERMOON + TOTAL LUNAR ECLIPSE + BLOOD MOON

... ALL IN ONE NIGHT!

 

 

  • BLUE MOON: when there are two Full Moons in a mounth
  • SUPERMOON: when the moon is close to its nearest approach to earth, appearing larger than normal
  • BLOOD MOON: the red tint earth's shadow casts on the moon during a lunar eclipse

 

♡ LOOK THE MOON ♡

JANUARY 31st 2018

Especially out west

 

DON'T LET ANYONE MISS THIS RARE EVENT!

!!! ENJOY !!!

Beginning at 5:30 a.m. EST on Jan. 31, a live feed of the Moon will be offered on NASA TV and NASA.gov/live. You can also follow at @NASAMoon.

 

Weather permitting, the NASA TV broadcast will feature views from the varying vantage points of telescopes at NASA’s Armstrong Flight Research Center in Edwards, California; Griffith Observatory in Los Angeles; and the University of Arizona’s Mt. Lemmon SkyCenter Observatory.

Credits: NASA
Credits: NASA

Global map showing areas of the world that will experience (weather permitting) the Jan. 31, 2018 “super blue blood moon.” The eclipse will be visible before sunrise on Jan. 31 for those in North America, Alaska and Hawaii. For those in the Middle East, Asia, eastern Russia, Australia and New Zealand, the “super blue blood moon” can be seen during moonrise the evening of the 31st.

Credits: NASA
Credits: NASA

Stages of the Jan. 31, 2018 “super blue blood moon” (weather permitting) are depicted in Pacific Time with “moonset” times for major cities across the U.S., which affect how much of the event viewers will see. While viewers along the East Coast will see only the initial stages of the eclipse before moonset, those in the West and Hawaii will see most or all of the lunar eclipse phases before dawn.

Credits: NASA 360

January 31 brings a lunar trifecta: the super blue blood Moon! This full moon is the third in a series of “supermoons,” when the Moon is closer to Earth in its orbit -- known as perigee -- and about 14 percent brighter than usual. It’s the second full moon of the month, commonly known as a “blue moon.” The super blue moon will pass through Earth’s shadow to give viewers in the right location a total lunar eclipse. While the Moon is in the Earth’s shadow it will take on a reddish tint, known as a “blood moon.”

“For the (continental) U.S., the viewing will be best in the West,” said Gordon Johnston, program executive and lunar blogger at NASA Headquarters in Washington. “Set your alarm early and go out and take a look.”

❤︎ Johnston’s monthly blog:


❤︎ NASA’s lunar website:


❤︎ To watch a NASA ScienceCast video, A Supermoon Trilogy about the Dec. 3, 2017, Jan. 1, 2018, and Jan. 31, 2018 supermoons, click here

❤︎ Love to observe the Moon? It’s easy to make a Moon Phases Calendar and Calculator that will keep all of the dates and times for the year’s phases of the Moon at your fingertips.

❤︎ Take notes and record your own illustrations of the Moon with a Moon observation journal, ready to download and print at moon.nasa.gov.

CREDITS & SOURCE


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